It’s what every fan base deserves, along with players on a roster where tough conversations must be had to set a course for the present in order to secure a better future. Transparency. It’s ugly and while not aesthetically pleasing to the eye, everyone can see what the Bulls are doing for the remainder of the NBA season. For the paying customers who still fill the seats at the United Center, it’s a “cry now so hopefully you laugh later” proposition. Bulls Executive-Vice President John Paxson addressed the media Tuesday and said what we all knew to be true, what everyone knew what was coming. He didn’t stand up in front of cameras and tape recorders and ask, “Do you like Brazilian music?” They’re tanking. They’re putting a little bit more sugar to go with it but it’s old-fashioned ‘tussin for the next several weeks. All of this is due to sight unseen—unless you watch college basketball or cue up European basketball highlights. When you see Michigan State’s Jaren Jackson take two hard dribbles from the top of the key, spin and dunk while being fouled, it makes sense. When Arizona’s DeAndre Ayton help on a driving guard to cut off a lane, recover to block a 3-point shot and run the floor for a layup in a six-second span, it makes sense. When Duke’s Marvin Bagley III seals his defender with one arm, catches with his left hand and finishes on the opposite side of the rim with ease, it all makes sense and kudos to the Bulls for not trying to fool a smart public with useless rhetoric. Every loss counts, of course, but the key thing about the NBA is this: No matter where a team picks, bad franchises make the worst of a good opportunity and good franchises make the best of any situation.