In each of the last last five years, Southern California has produced at least two of the 10 pro-style quarterback recruits on the 247Sports Composite. Texas has produced a handful of its own, but no region has churned them out like SoCal.

USC signs QBs from that group frequently, but the Trojans have struggled to field top offenses anyway. Yet out at Texas Tech, where top-10 QBs Texan or otherwise don’t sign, Kliff Kingsbury coached two top-10 offenses by S&P+, never ranked lower than 39th (his first season), and coached three QBs who are currently drawing paychecks in the NFL.

In 2018, while coaching for his job, injuries forced Kingsbury to start three different QBs with three-star true freshman Alan Bowman as the primary guy. The Red Raiders still finished 26th nationally in Offensive S&P+ and came within narrow margins of winning shootouts with both Oklahoma (51-46) and Texas (41-34) in back to back weeks.

Now the QB King is headed to the preeminent program in the most talent-rich part of the country for talented QBs and offensive skill players. USC’s decision to retain Clay Helton, only to completely overhaul his entire staff and offensive approach, was a curious one. But by landing Kingsbury as the offensive coordinator, the Trojans have married talent and coaching in a way that will overhaul a blue-blood program’s scheme.

Historically, USC’s built its offense around running backs.

Some used to refer USC s Tailback U for its prodigious success in churning out star RBs like O.J. Simpson, Marcus Allen, and Reggie Bush.

For years and years, the Trojans’ offense was built around the pro-style I-formation. Under Pete Carroll, they brought in Norm Chow to bring West Coast passing into the mix. Clay Helton added some spread formations and RPOs, but the offense was still centered around running the ball and then flinging it around against defenses keying the RB.