Seven quick thoughts on the easing of hostilities between Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers, as he arrived at training camp Tuesday while they're reportedly reworking his deal to bring him back for the 2021 season ...

 

1. The contours of the arrangement make it clear that Rodgers never had enough leverage to force the Packers to trade him now, at least if he wasn't willing to sacrifice a swimming pool full of cash (including a substantial portion of what he'd already earned). Yes, Rodgers got what he wanted - there's a very real chance he'll be traded next offseason, when we'll get to speculate all over again - but it was largely on the team's terms, and according to the team's timeline.

 

2. Think about it this way: Green Bay already has what it hopes will be its post-Rodgers quarterback in Jordan Love. And even if the decision to draft Love without first informing Rodgers was the source of all this passive-aggressive tension, Love's presence meant the Packers were presumably prepared to turn the page eventually. The most logical scenario always involved the Packers handing the keys to Love in 2022, when he'll still have two years remaining on his cheap, cost-controlled rookie deal, with an opportunity to flip Rodgers for some king's ransom of draft assets and/or players. That calculation hasn't changed in light of Monday's agreement.