Major League Baseball this season issued about 240 fines to about 140 players for failure to properly wear a face mask, people with knowledge of the process said. Although players routinely appealed the fines to the commissioner’s office, none have been overturned in a hearing, irking some players and their agents. In some instances, players have argued that their mask was down because they were taking a drink of water, but MLB has not been swayed. (Some fines, though, have been rescinded prior to hearings.)

Players were to receive a warning for at least a first violation, while subsequent violations brought a fine of $1,000, then $2,500, then $5,000. The general ability to issue discipline was agreed to by both MLB and the Players Association. MLB and the MLBPA declined comment.

The appeals process is the same that’s employed for on-field violations of more routine sorts, such as intentionally throwing at an opposing player. If the fine is up to $1,000, MLB’s senior vice president of on-field operations, Michael Hill, handles the appeal. For fines above $1,000, MLB’s John McHale, a special assistant to the commissioner, hears the case. Ultimately, the league office has sole discretion as to whether to reduce a penalty.

“We’re talking about tens of thousands, maybe $100,000 that are at stake here for players,” a player agent said. “The appeal’s heard by the guy who issued the fine.”

On the flip side, the premise of the mask mandate is player and staff health. Players and agents are not the only ones who are annoyed. A club official thought that players have been unreasonable in appealing so many fines, given that the Players Association agreed to this set-up with MLB.

“The union agreed to this, why are they (appealing)?” one club source said. “This is craziness.”