On a team with few holes and championship expectations, who hits leadoff for the Cubs has become a prominent conversation.

You don't need to go back too far to discover that not having a prototypical leadoff hitter doesn't mean much of anything. After all, the Cubs lost Dexter Fowler, couldn't find anyone to consistently hit leadoff and still scored 822 runs, the second most in the National League.

But a new season and no additions to the lineup that put the leadoff conversation to rest means it's a talking point yet again. So who will hit leadoff for the Cubs in 2018?

"There’s very few real, legitimate No. 1 hitters out there these days, and when you find one, you like to hold on to it," Joe Maddon said earlier in spring training. "I think a lot of teams, they’ll put different guys up there. It’s almost like having a closer. If you don’t have a legitimate closer, it’s still OK to work the ninth inning in other ways. If you don’t have a prototypical leadoff hitter, you can work it in other ways. I’m fine with that.

"I think we scored a lot of runs last year. We were fine with that. The conversation is what it is. I’m very comfortable with moving that around based on guys who get on base often. That’s the whole point. And when you can combine that with a guy that has a high on-base and then he hits homers, too, that’s even more attractive. We have a lot of guys who are capable. We’ll let it play out, you’ll see a lot of guys in the one hole throughout spring training. But I know by the time the season arrives, whoever we have hitting there, I’ll be happy with that."

Of course, there's room for improvement. Last season, only the bottom two spots in the lineup produced lower numbers than the leadoff hole, with the Cubs slashing .246/.324/.422 at the top of the order. Getting better there means being an even better team, all important when the expectations are World Series or bust.

But whether it matters a lot or a little, here's a list of candidates for the job.

Anthony Rizzo

Remember when Rizzo dubbed himself, jokingly of course, "the greatest leadoff hitter of all-time?" Albert Almora Jr. does.

"We have the best leadoff guy in the game with Rizzo," Albert Almora Jr. said earlier in spring training. "Five home runs in three days it felt like."

It was pretty impressive. All in all, Rizzo's 14 games batting leadoff yielded 15 hits, five homers, two doubles, a triple, 12 RBIs, 11 runs scored and six walks in 59 plate appearances.

"I said, ‘If I’m going to lead off this year, you’ve got to teach me.’ He said, ‘I am the best leadoff hitter in the world.’ ‘All right, you do it then.'"

Anthony, what do you say?


Well, that settles that.

Kyle Schwarber

Schwarber, as I'm sure no one has forgotten, was the Cubs' leadoff guy out of the gates last spring. It's not that he wasn't suited for it — he is really good at getting on base — but he really didn't succeed there. That Maddon decision didn't sit well with many fans, and it didn't look like a good idea at all when Schwarber was sent down to Triple-A for a spell in the middle of the campaign.

The slimmed-down Schwarber figures to be much better this year — and even in what was considered a disastrous 2017, he still hit 30 home runs — but the leadoff spot might not be the place for him.

Kyle, will you be batting leadoff again?