The awkwardness of how Adam Wainwright’s knee bent when trying to field the ball in the seventh inning was not in the eye of the beholder but in the report from the Cardinals medical staff.

Before his teammates could chuckle at his misstep, they had to take a breath.

“Once I realized he was alright, I was able to make fun of him a little bit,” left fielder Matt Holliday admitted. “Like a baby giraffe.”

Seven innings and 79 pitches into what could have been a second consecutive shutout, Wainwright had to leave Tuesday’s game against the Mets with a hyperextended right knee. While the bullpen clinched a 3-0 victory for the club and a fourth win for Wainwright, the Cardinals’ ace was in the training room testing the strength and range of motion. He had to go through a series of exercises meant to gauge the stability of his knee, and Cardinals officials said the righthander passed each. He was not taken for an additional scan.

The team will have to wait to see how tender or swollen the knee is today before determining whether Wainwright will need more than a couple of days rest. Wainwright insisted that he will make his next scheduled start, Sunday against Pittsburgh.

“My ACL, MCL, UCL, all those LCLs, QCLs, all the CLs are good,” Wainwright said, listing actual and fictional ligaments that could have been damaged in the twist. “It’s one of those (plays) that looks scarier than it actually was. … I expected it to be more painful than it actually was.

“All is good.”

On the mound, Wainwright (4-1) has never been as good, several teammates suggested. Manager Mike Matheny said his ace is “pitching like I’ve never seen him.” Fresh from his shutout of Washington last week, Wainwright buzz-sawed through the Mets’ lineup with his refined and unpredictable array of pitches.

The righty struck out only three Mets, but he was able to minimize their rallies with repeated groundouts and at least one out from four different pitches. Moments after Holliday saved the game by robbing Chris Young of a home run, Wainwright got a key double play on a curveball.