Trevor Booker is a restricted free agent, but he presents a unique case for the Wizards going into the offseason. The power forward, whose emergence was key with Nene missing 29 games, is in line for a higher qualifying offer if that's the route the team chooses.

A qualifying offer is a standing offer for a one-year guaranteed contract. A team can't gain right of first refusal without making an offer by June 30.

As the No. 23 overall pick in 2010, Booker was due a qualifying offer of $3.4 million. But because the reserve started 45 games and played 1,553 minutes for the Wizards in 2013-14, Booker is due a higher offer because he meets what's called the "starter criteria" in the collective bargaining agreement. If a player starts 41 games or plays at least 2,000 minutes in the regular season he qualifies for a bump in salary.

So what does that ultimately mean? If a player is picked between Nos. 10-30 and meets the starter criteria, he gets the same qualifying offer of the ninth pick in his draft class.