Dale Murphy's 15 years have come and gone. Yesterday, he received just 18.6 percent of the Hall of Fame vote, and that wasn't nearly enough. It was his last year of eligibility, and if he's ever going to be enshrined, a committee is going to have to do it. The writers' consensus seemed to be that Murphy had a Hall of Fame peak, but not a Hall of Fame career.

That might put into perspective the Hall of Fame potential of Robinson Cano.

Cano turned 30 years old in October, meaning he just completed his age 26 through 29 seasons. They were not his first great years — he'd been an all-star and finished 22nd in MVP voting three years earlier — but they were the years that established Cano as one of the game's elite superstars.

Murphy turned 30 in 1986, meaning his age 26 through 29 seasons came from 1982 to 1985. They were not his first great years — he'd been an all-star and finished 12th in MVP voting two years earlier — but they were the years that established Murphy as one of the game's elite superstars.