If all goes according to plan in the future, Andre Drummond’s game will develop into a viable first option on offense for the Pistons.

But his present role is to dominate the glass, irritate opposing players, play above the rim and when necessary keep his lifeless team afloat.

That’s the role he filled Monday in the Pistons’ 96-85 win over the drowning New York Knicks, a game which didn’t earn much in the way of style points.

Drummond’s 26 rebounds were a career-high. He also had 17 points and three blocked shots, and played with the desperation that two teams clinging to fading playoff hopes needed.

Drummond blocked two Tyson Chandler dunk attempts, and another from frustrated Knicks star Carmelo Anthony, who has done his best in vain to halt a losing streak that now has reached seven.

“Get 30,” teammate Brandon Jennings playfully said of Drummond’s rebounding night.

His block of one attempted Chandler dunk early helped spark the Pistons on their way to erasing an early, 14-point deficit.

“That play really got us going,” said Drummond, who played 46 minutes, a feat he couldn’t have accomplished in his rookie season. “It got energy going.”

But it was back-to-back, deft spin moves along the baseline that fired up the crowd — which included new Lions coach Jim Caldwell, who might have envisioned Drummond as a wide receiver at Ford Field on Sunday afternoons.

That stretch helped push a two-point lead to seven before the end of the third, before the Pistons put the floundering Knicks out of their misery.

“I’m a glue guy. It’s not my time to be the guy, shoot 20 shots,” Drummond said. “It’s my job to grab rebounds and when I do get it, dunk it back in.

“I don’t need the ball to score, I don’t need a lot of touches.”

He got his hands on the basketball all night, as there were plenty of boards to be had, with the Knicks shooting 39 percent and the Pistons 42. The Knicks led, 25-11, in the first but didn’t look fluid and the Pistons methodically worked their way back, despite missing plenty of easy layups and botched passes.