Before selling the Rockets, Leslie Alexander set up the team to spend big. He signed off on a super-max extension for James Harden and a trade for Chris Paul, who’ll be an unrestricted free agent next summer.

Houston already has nearly $76 million committed in 2018-19 and more than $85 million in 2019-20 committed to just five players (Harden, Ryan Anderson, Eric Gordon, P.J. Tucker and Nene). That doesn’t even account for three starters headed toward free agency next summer (Paul, Trevor Ariza and Clint Capela, who’s eligible for an extension through Monday). Re-signing that trio would vault the Rockets well into the luxury tax.

New Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta, in a Q&A with Tim MacMahon of ESPN:

ESPN: On that note, this looks like a team that can be a legitimate contender for several years, but the price will rise significantly next summer if the core is kept together. What’s your tolerance level for paying the luxury tax?

Fertitta: This is what was told to me by my experts that work here: If it’s going to take you to the Finals, then you should pay the luxury tax. And I totally agree. If you have to lose money to get to the Finals or win a championship, I think you do what you have to do because it’s going to come back to you.