Wally Stanowski is 94 years old, but his memory still works like a steel trap. Ask him if he remembers the two Stanley Cups he won with the Maple Leafs, and the oldest living member of the team starts reciting the odd speech that Conn Smythe gave after Toronto lost the first three games to Detroit in the 1942 final.

“Smythe said the little man wanted you to win,” Stanowski said with a laugh. “The little man from up north and from the west and from the east. That was who we were fighting for. And we came back and won four straight.”

Those were wonderful times, he said. They were times to be remembered, honoured and cherished.

And for the past 70 or so years they have been. But if Tim Leiweke has his way, that will soon change. The recently hired head of Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment no longer wants to sell the team on the past. He wants to put it in a time capsule and bury it in the sand.

“I don’t want the players walking in the hallways of the Air Canada Centre and seeing pictures from 1962,” Leiweke told Bloomberg News earlier this week. “Get rid of those pictures and tell (the players), ‘This is your legacy.’ ”

Leiweke’s point is that rather than dwelling on the black-and-white memories of a six-team league, the franchise should be focused on making its own history. That is what he did in Los Angeles, where he celebrated six combined championships with the NBA’s Lakers and NHL’s Kings.