It has been an experiment worth running - two productive centers on one team sharing the court at the same time.

Unfortunately for the Rockets, the experiment of starting Omer Asik and Dwight Howard hasn't produced the results coach Kevin McHale was anticipating.

"That big lineup - I am 50/50 on that," McHale said. "It takes time, and the chemistry has to get better. Every time I think I am done with it, they do something that makes me want to keep trying it."

Asik and Howard didn't get a lot of time to jell in training camp because Asik was nursing a calf injury. They started playing together near the end of the preseason. In spurts, the lineup has been extremely effective, yet the Rockets are just 5-3 two weeks into the season.

In the season-opening victory over Charlotte, the duo combined for 40 rebounds, prompting a pretty positive response.

But as the season has progressed, the Rockets have struggled to get a good offensive flow early in games, prompting McHale to rely on a smaller lineup to put points on the board.

In Monday's 110-104 double-overtime victory over Toronto, McHale started forward Terrence Jones in the second half. The coach wanted to see a new look after the Rockets came out struggling again on offense in the first half.

Jones, who hadn't played in the regular season, had seven points, 10 rebounds and four blocked shots in 32 minutes. He guarded the Raptors' Rudy Gay, who hit only 11 or 37 shots in the game.

"I liked what I saw," McHale said. "Terrence was in a tough spot. It's always hard when you don't play, and he played well.

"I was getting a look at something, and I wanted to see how it looked, and I liked what I saw."

Jones' play Monday likely earned him some future playing time. Whether McHale will begin using a different starting lineup remains uncertain, but he did say the Rockets would be going to the small lineup more.

Howard said he will continue to do what is asked of him, but he admitted that playing power forward to start off games has been a big adjustment.

"I have to do whatever it takes," Howard said. "I have been playing the 'five' (position) for nine years, so to switch back to play at the 'four' and play some at 'four' (and) some at 'five' is a little different.

"But I want to win, so I will do whatever it takes."