Ten days into a new baseball season, here are three intriguing questions to ponder:

-- How fortunate are the Mets that Scott Boras scared teams away from drafting Matt Harvey as a first-round pick back in 2007 when he was coming out of high school?

-- If the aging Phillies fall apart, as it appears they might, would the Yankees forget the luxury-tax threshold and trade for Cliff Lee at midseason?

-- Six Justin Upton home runs later, Mets fans, would you have been willing to trade Zack Wheeler for him?

One at a time:

AGENT HERO
It’s already starting to look like there will come a day when the Mets will be at the mercy of the notorious Boras, Harvey’s agent.

Then again, they’ll always have Boras to thank for Harvey being a Met in the first place. They were able to draft him in 2010 only because Boras’ price tag caused the righthander to fall to the third round of the 2007 draft, selected 118th overall by the Angels, and Harvey opted for college instead.

Going into that draft, Rick Porcello, also represented by Boras, Harvey and lefthander Madison Bumgarner were considered the top high school pitchers in the country.

Remarkably, all three were also committed to playing in college at North Carolina.

So Bumgarner went 10th to the Giants, and signed for a $2 million bonus. Porcello, considered the best of the three by draft day, fell to 27th to the Tigers because teams feared Boras’ demands, and indeed it cost Detroit $7.28 million to sign the righthander from Seton Hall Prep.

Then there was Harvey. Two major league executives heavily involved in that draft say Harvey’s stock had slipped a bit because his senior year in high school in Connecticut hadn’t been as impressive as expected. Still, he projected as a late first-round pick.

However, the execs recall that Boras was quietly putting out the word that he thought Harvey should be worth nearly as much as Porcello.

“You were talking ridiculously huge money," one of the execs said. “Teams were afraid to risk a first-round pick and then get into a situation like the Yankees had with Gerrit Cole (in 2008), where you don’t sign the guy."