As defenses go, the one Bears coach John Fox offered Sunday at Soldier Field after the Bears' 23-16 loss was as flimsy as the one he saw flailing all day against the Packers.

"In nine games, two of them we didn't give ourselves a chance, but in seven games we've had the opportunity to win every single one of them,'' Fox said. "The reality is, we are 3-6."

The reality is, coaching makes the difference in close games, and the Bears' sixth loss threatens to become the one history remembers as the point of no return for faith in Fox. In four futile, frustrating quarters against a beatable opponent at home, the Bears undid eight games' worth of progress.

It was premature to speculate about Fox's future around their open date because a respectable start put the Bears in position to realistically approach a .500 season. But those of us who considered the possibility of Fox saving his job with a strong second half now can concede the Bears looking so sloppy and unprepared after a weekend off make that unlikely. Dropping to 1-5 against the Packers will get the McCaskeys' attention quicker than any other of Fox's shortcomings. In other words, feel free to start jonesing for Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels or Googling Eagles offensive coordinator Frank Reich. Dave Toub anyone?

Save any cockeyed optimism about the Bears coming close or rookie quarterback Mitch Trubisky making progress for another day, one perhaps when they weren't outcoached and outplayed by a Packers team playing on short rest with backups at quarterback, running back, tight end and offensive tackle. This is what happens when a 3-5 team gets full of itself, fattened by what-ifs and maybes in a football city starved for success.

Opportunity knocked to see if the Bears wanted to save their season, and Fox left it standing on the front porch of possibility, ignored. So say hello again to Bears hostility, everybody. Any feel-good vibes that surrounded Halas Hall for the last month or so vanished, sometime between Fox's ill-advised challenge and his defense's poorly timed surrender. We could build a case for the bright side by examining the relative ease of the rest of the Bears schedule, but that would create the false impression that it matters. It doesn't, not for a Bears team that committed 11 penalties in the first half (four were declined) and gained zero yards in the third quarter.