Not long ago, Joel Embiid and the Sixers agreed to a max contract extension — five years, $146 million. The Sixers are betting on Embiid staying healthy because when he is there is no doubt he is a max player.

In fact, Embiid has been so good to start the season — 22.9 points and 11.3 rebounds a game, plus being one of the best defensive big men in the league — he stands a chance of making an additional $5 million a year by being named First Team All-NBA. It’s called the Derrick Rose rule. The fantastic Bobby Marks of ESPN explains (insider, behind the paywall).

Signed to a five-year $146 million extension, Embiid’s total compensation will increase to $178 million if he earns first-team All-NBA honors or is named Most Valuable Player this season. While the MVP is unlikely, Embiid could have an outside shot at first-team All-NBA based on his strong early-season play and the injury to Rudy Gobert. Unlike the All-Star selection process, in which the voting is split into backcourt and frontcourt, All-NBA is designated by position. Anthony Davis, named first-team All-NBA last season, should receive votes at power forward with DeMarcus Cousins now entrenched at center. Cousins — on pace for a career season statistically — is the biggest challenger to Embiid for the spot.

While a lot of people perceived Davis as a power forward last season, he played 64 percent of his minutes at center, so a lot of voters — myself included — treated him as a center for All-NBA. This season he has played center just 29 percent of the time, he will be a forward in voting. Rudy Gobert was on the second team, he’s been injured. DeAndre Jordan was on the third team, but his impact has been muted some this season (he misses Chris Paul feeding him the rock).