The Canadiens were eliminated from the playoffs by the New York Rangers over the weekend, and it was a pretty solid bet that the focus would turn to general manager Marc Bergevin in that market to open this week.

First round exits are not appreciated in most NHL cities, but especially a town like Montreal.



The Canadiens were eliminated from the playoffs by the New York Rangers over the weekend, and it was a pretty solid bet that the focus would turn to general manager Marc Bergevin in that market to open this week.

First round exits are not appreciated in most NHL cities, but especially a town like Montreal.

So what is the situation with Bergevin, from the perspective of hockey’s preeminent Insider?

“It’s a good question,” considered Bob McKenzie while on Montreal’s TSN 690 on Monday morning, part of a 15-minute discussion centered wholly on the aftermath of the Canadiens’ exit. “The short answer is I don’t have any knowledge. I don’t have any strong, strong, sense based on any evidence that he’s in trouble or that there’s anything going on.

“Having said that, when you get beat out the way the Montreal Canadiens got beat out there’s two ways to look at it. You heard Max Pacioretty and Claude Julien espouse one of those two opinions. And that is, ‘Hey, we did a lot of really good things. Henrik Lundqvist out-goaled Carey Price…’

McKenzie paused.

“Well, they didn’t say that, I did.”

“ ‘ We got beat by a hot goaltender and if we were to play the series over again it might go the other way in our favor. Therefore there’s no need to panic. Calm everybody down. We’re not trading Price. We’re not trading Paxioretty. We’re not firing the general manager. We’re just going to stay the course and we’re going to be fine.’ “

“That’s one view. Fans obviously don’t embrace that. And I think, to a degree, it’s fair for the fans not to fully embrace that ‘Well, you know what – stuff happens,’ because you’re right, there was a seismic trade made in the off-season that said to everybody – or at least we all viewed it that way – that the here and now has become that much more important because we gave up so many years on Weber for P.K..

“So the here and now became so much more important, and then all of the sudden the here and now didn’t materialize. There’s nothing to show for the here and now in the very short term. So that’s a concern.