Gregg Popovich has made that quote, the Stonecutter Credo, a mantra for the Spurs. Six years after he left San Antonio, George Hill has not forgotten it.

“One thing that Coach Pop really taught me when I first got to the NBA is keep pounding that rock, no matter what,” Hill said. “When times get rough or you got goods and highs and lows, never get too high. Never get too low. But always stay subtle and humble and keep getting better.”

Hill has followed Popovich’s keep-pounding-that-rock advice. In a more literal sense.

A combo guard with the Spurs and mostly an off-ball point guard with the Pacers, Hill has carried a bigger load for the Jazz this season as a true lead guard who pounds the rock – dribbles – to create offense far more frequently. He’s averaging a career-high 17.2 points with 4.1 assists per game while playing his usual staunch defense. Utah has outscored opponents by 10.3 points per 100 possessions with Hill on the floor, a net rating that would trail only the Warriors (+11.6) among teams.

“We anticipated it being a good fit,” Utah coach Quin Snyder said. “But he’s exceeded that.”

Here’s the secret of Hill’s “breakout season:” He has done this before.

In 2014-15, with Paul George injured and Lance Stephenson in Charlotte, the Pacers gave Hill a larger role. Like this year, he excelled in it.

The 2014-15 and 2016-17 seasons are Hill’s only two in his nine-year career with an above average usage rate. They’re also the two seasons with his highest effective field-goal percentages and lowest turnover percentages.

Long perceived as a limited player who’d wilt with too much ball-handling responsibility, Hill has been even more efficient in bigger roles.

“I think I’ve established myself now and showed everybody what I can do,” George declared in 2015. “There’s no turning back now.”

Indiana had other ideas. George got healthy, and the Pacers signed Monta Ellis. Hill’s offensive role shrunk last season.