Miami Valley taxpayers and the University of Dayton shelled out more than $57,000 in overtime to fund police officers from 13 jurisdictions to control crowds at the University of Dayton as its men’s basketball team made a historic run in this year’s NCAA tournament.

Faced with the job of clearing the streets of thick crowds of thousands of students and visiting revelers, law enforcement officers at one point or another endured thrown half-filled beer bottles, fist-swinging brawlers, fireworks, couches set afire, plenty of curses and some stumbling drunks who had difficulty standing. Some of the revelers jumped up and down on vehicles as though they were trampolines.

Police were dispatched from UD, Dayton, Five Rivers MetroParks, Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, the Ohio State Patrol, Brookville, Huber Heights, Kettering, Miami Twp., Riverside, Oakwood, Sinclair Community College and Vandalia. Between the three days of celebrations, a total of 350 officers patrolled the campus.

Those are among the details contained in a lengthy after-action report from the Dayton Police Department obtained exclusively by this newspaper and WHIO-TV that revisits the nights of March 22, 27 and 29 as the University of Dayton student “ghetto” went wild. The report’s analysis recommends a number of steps that could curtail problems the next time an out-of-control celebration threatens.

They include taking preemptive action like designating no parking zones on dates when disturbances could be common like St. Patrick’s Day or NCAA tournaments, making residents responsible for clean-ups, increasing street lighting in key areas, cutting back trees and shrubs to increase visibility and discourage tree-climbing, fixing concrete that could be torn up for projectiles, and requiring local alcohol sellers to not sell bottled beer during certain times since the glass can be a danger.

The university could also consider street cameras to discourage bad behavior, although privacy concerns could outweigh their use. The recommendations were authored by Dayton Police officer Colin L. Patterson of the East Patrol Operation Division using a law enforcement crime prevention model dubbed Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design.

The celebrations took a toll. By the time they wrapped up, Dayton Police officers were punched in the face, a Five Rivers MetroParks officer was hit in the chest by a thrown rock, and a media representative was hit in the face by a thrown can of beer. Officers were injured while controlling the crowd and 32 people were arrested and charged by either Dayton or UD police. Of those, 13 were UD students. Eight officers reported injuries in total and three students were hurt.

At one point, two paddy wagons on hand were filled.

Police found that of 29 reported crimes over a month in the area, 21 were the result of the March 27 disturbance and two crimes arose from disturbances March 23 and 17. Only a theft from a Brown Street restaurant where an unattended cell phone was stolen was not related.