Very little about Friday night’s matchup appeared to be in the Yankees’ favor.

Oakland featured the highest-scoring offense and the best record in the American League, while David Phelps was riding the longest losing streak of his career and was pitching in a place where the Yankees had lost seven straight over the past two years.

It was David vs. Goliath.

David won.

Phelps silenced the Athletics’ mighty bats while the Yankees’ resurgent offense busted out for a second straight night, disappointing the rare sellout crowd as the Bombers rolled to a 7-0 win, their first at the Coliseum in more than two years.

“It’s definitely one of the best starts of my career, probably,” said Phelps, who had lost four straight starts, posting a 6.57 ERA in the process. “Come in here against a team that’s first in its division with one of the best records in baseball. My biggest thing is going out and trying to give us a chance to win
every time out.

“Our offense gave me a chance to be successful out there, so I tip my cap to them because they did a great job for me, giving me a cushion early on. They made some great plays behind me on the defensive side too.”

Phelps blanked Oakland for 6.2 innings in his best start of the season, giving up two hits and three walks while striking out four.

Six different Yankees drove in runs as the offense had its most productive night in more than two weeks. After going 12 consecutive games without topping the four-run mark, the Bombers have now scored 13 in the past two games, extending their winning streak to four games.

“That's the recipe for scoring a lot of runs,” Joe Girardi said of the balanced attack. “That's what you need to do at times. Through all this, the guys have kept at it. They've had their struggles but they've kept at it. We're hitting the ball hard.”

Brett Gardner, Derek Jeter and Jacoby Ellsbury opened the game with singles against Oakland ace Sonny Gray, giving the Yankees a 1-0 lead on Ellsbury’s hit. That also extended the center fielder’s hitting streak to 17 games, the longest active streak in the majors.