There are growing pains in all professions, but not all professions are played out in full public view.

The Sixers on Monday night were hanging around in the fourth quarter against the Clippers. They were down seven points midway through the quarter when Evan Turner missed a 10-foot jumper in the paint.

Turner could not hide his disdain for not getting a whistle that would have sent him to the foul line. The game played on, but all the fourth-year player could think about was chasing down the official and giving him a piece of his mind.

Turner’s actions proved costly because while he was preoccupied venting his anger, Jared Dudley was scoring a lay-up on which Turner fouled him after getting to a spot on the floor late.

“I was irritated because from what I was taught you are always supposed to let the shooter come down, but on eight or nine shots I didn’t have the opportunity to come down,” Turner said. “That’s pretty much it. I got frustrated for a play.”

Turner was frustrated for more than one play. His body language says he is frustrated a lot, and by not channeling his frustrations properly, he hurts his team and certainly his personal reputation, which in a contract year can be damaging.

“It is just part of the evolution of competitive people because it hurts us, bottom line, and he knows it and he has to get through it and he will,” Sixers head coach Brett Brown said. “It has been an ongoing conversation. That is my job to help him.