The University of Cincinnati Bearcats have no doubt that Louisville is coming to town this weekend looking for revenge after losing to the Bearcats, 69-66, in Louisville on Jan. 30.

“But we’re going to be ready to play them as well,” said UC guard Sean Kilpatrick.

Louisville guard Chris Jones wasted no time stating the Cardinals’ intentions on Tuesday after they beat South Florida.

“It’s really big,” Jones said, “because they got us here on our home court and I think that’s embarrassing. I think we’re still mad about that, so that’s still in the back of my head. We know what it takes to beat them now – down the stretch, play good, tough defense.”

The Bearcats say they would expect nothing less from the Cardinals and they’ll be ready when Louisville arrives at sold-out Fifth Third Arena for the noon tipoff.

UC (24-3 overall, 13-1 American Athletic Conference) leads the league by a game over second-place Louisville (22-4, 11-2).

The Bearcats let a 17-point lead slip away the last time they played Louisville, fell behind by three and then rallied to win behind Kilpatrick’s 28 points. Head coach Mick Cronin said after UC’s 77-49 win at Central Florida on Wednesday that his players had better be prepared for the Cardinals’ best effort this time.

“I’m a big believer in who’s got the mental edge going into games,” Cronin said. “We can’t allow them to have that. We have to understand how great they’re playing and we’ve got to have tremendous humility and understand how great we’re going to have to play to win. If we don’t, we’re in trouble.”

Louisville has won five in a row by an average margin of 26 points since its loss to UC. The Bearcats have lost once in five games – falling to SMU in Dallas to end their 15-game winning streak.

Cronin said the Bearcats might have surprised the Louisville players in the first meeting, even though he said he’s sure they didn’t surprise Louisville coach Rick Pitino.

“I feel like they didn’t respect what we had for them,” said senior center Justin Jackson. “You feel like you have to gain their respect. That’s what we felt we had to come in and do and that’s what we did.”